• beefcat@beehaw.org
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    7 months ago

    that must be the reason seeing as java is available for just about everything these days

    modern arm socs are impressive but i seriously doubt that 2 watt chip is beating the 75 watt chip it replaced

    • Dark Arc@social.packetloss.gg
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      7 months ago

      Well, Java can call into native code. I’m pretty sure Mojang isn’t doing that sort of thing, but I wasn’t entirely sure they weren’t depending on a subset of the JVM or a native library that is defacto standard in the x86 world.

      • Skull giver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl
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        7 months ago

        Programs like Box86 and Box64 csn efficiently make native calls work out if there are native equivalents available, and there’s always qemu-static if that fails.

        I don’t remember Minecraft server edition relying on native binaries, but it’s been a while since last ran it, maybe Mojang changed it.

        • Dark Arc@social.packetloss.gg
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          7 months ago

          I don’t remember Minecraft server edition relyint on native binaries, but it’s been a while since last ran it, maybe Mojang changed it.

          Same, and it sounds like it doesn’t… I just wasn’t sure. You can also run into things like “I never realized this was using… glibc… which is on every x86 Linux computer.” I don’t think that’s happened either though.

          Programs like Box86 and Box64 csn efficiently make native calls work out if there are native equivalents available, and there’s always qemu-static if that fails.

          Interesting, good to know

    • Peter WillemsenA
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      7 months ago

      The server was a second hand server that has 32GB RAM and 2 i7 CPU’s, it was made in 2015 so quite old. The Odroid has only 8GB of RAM but for my purposes that’s enough, and given the power it saves it’s absolutely a bargain!

      If I ever need this much memory again I can just temporarily spin up something more powerful, for all other 24/7 tasks I can keep up the efficient ARM server.

      • beefcat@beehaw.org
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        7 months ago

        it’s great that the new machine suits your needs with so little power. whatever gets the job done with the least energy and cost is almost always the best option.

        we are just questioning whether its performance is truly comparable with the old one. because arm cannot replace x86 on performance per watt alone, many applications need more performance regardless of wattage. i think your old machine was overkill for your use case

        • Peter WillemsenA
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          7 months ago

          Yeah makes sense! It probably doesn’t although I have no benchmarks to prove it, it just is enough for me. I know this much though: even if the x86 server had the same specs (ram, GHz) as the arm version it likely still draws more power